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What do hockey cards mean to players? Sometimes a lot, sometimes nothing

In his Hockey Card Stories book, Ken Reid revisits his own childhood, picking some of his favorite cards from his youth and asking 59 former NHL players what their pieces of cardboard means to them.
The Hockey News

The Hockey News

For many of us, buying hockey cards was a celebrated part of our childhood, from ripping open packs of new cards each year to trading doubles with classmates.

In Hockey Card Stories, Sportsnet Central anchor Ken Reid revisits his own childhood, picking some of his favorite cards from his youth and asking 59 former NHL players what their pieces of cardboard means to them.

His choice of subjects is varied, from legends to bit players.

Their responses are varied, too. Some were excited to share their stories. Craig Fisher wistfully recounts the day he received the FedEx package containing a copy of his rookie card and the payment check from the card company.

Others could have cared less, like Phil Esposito, who thought posing for hockey cards “was a waste of time.”

Many were amused when remembering their 1970s hairdos, while others were horrified by the photos used on their old O-Pee-Chee cards.

The 255-page collection is illustrated with full-color pictures of cards from Reid’s own collection adorned with creases, tears and other defects that didn’t matter so much to us back then.

Any hockey fan, collector or otherwise, will enjoy the stories Reid gathered for this book.

This feature appears in the Jan. 26 edition of The Hockey News magazine. Get in-depth features like this one, and much more, by subscribing now.

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