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NHL Bloodlines Run Deep in the OHL Draft

The Ontario Hockey League's draft wrapped up this weekend, and while the hockey world was introduced to some new names, a few familiar names made their way to new teams as well.
Gabriel Frasca

The Ontario Hockey League's draft wrapped up this weekend, and while the hockey world was introduced to some new names, a few familiar names made their way to new teams as well. 

Hockey is known for family ties, and the 2022 OHL draft was no exception with many sons of famous fathers and mothers getting chosen over the past weekend.

Dakoda Rhéaume-Mullen, the son of Canadian hockey legend Manon Rhéaume was selected in the seventh round, 124th overall by the Sarnia Sting. Rhéaume won multiple World Championship gold medals and an Olympic silver, too. Notably, she was the first woman to play in an NHL pre-season game when she suited up for the Tampa Bay Lightning. Rhéaume also played professional men’s hockey in the ECHL and IHL.

In the ninth round, the Hamilton Bulldogs selected Daniel Berehowsky 183rd overall. The Honeybaked forward is the son of former NHL defender Drake Berehowsky, who went on to appear in 549 NHL games. He’s currently the head coach and general manager for the ECHL’s Orlando Solar Bears.

Next off the board was Lukas Fischer, the son of Detroit Red Wings director of player personnel Jiri Fischer, a veteran of more than 300 games. The younger Fischer played for Compuware and was chosen 208th overall in the 11th round of the draft by the Sarnia Sting. His father was the 25th overall pick by Detroit in 1998.

In the final round of the draft, a pair of familiar surnames were called in Noah Lapointe (302nd overall by the Hamilton Bulldogs) and Birk Cassels (290th overall by the Ottawa 67s). Lapointe, a defender, who played for the Shattuck-St. Mary’s Sabres, is the son of former NHLer Martin Lapointe. Martin Lapointe played 991 regular-season NHL games winning two Stanley Cups with the Detroit Red Wings and also captained the Chicago Blackhawks.

Cassels, an Ohio Blue Jackets goalie is the son of Andrew Cassels, who played more than 1,000 NHL games with six franchises. Andrew was a first-round pick of the Montreal Canadiens, 17th overall in 1987 while playing for the 67s. Birk’s older brother Cole Cassels was drafted by the Vancouver Canucks, and currently plays in the AHL.

While these players showcased that hockey often runs in the family, they weren’t the only familiar names selected. In the opening round of the draft, Gabriel Frasca was chosen 17th overall by the Kingston Frontenacs. A member of the OHL Cup champion Mississauga Senators, Frasca will replace his older brother Jordan with Kingston, who recently finished his final season of OHL eligibility, and signed with the NHL’s Pittsburgh Penguins.

In the third round, Broden McConnell-Barker from the London Jr. Knights was chosen to follow his older brother Bryce with the Soo Greyhounds. Bryce McConnell-Barker is the 28th ranked North American skater for the upcoming NHL Draft by Central Scouting in their most recent ranking.

Nickolas Iafrate, a Don Mills Flyers forward and causing of NHL all-star Al Iafrate, went in the sixth round, 120th overall to the Flint Firebirds.

While bloodlines don’t predict OHL or NHL success, family ties to the game of hockey are strong, as evidenced in the recent OHL draft.

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